Genesis Park Blog

Naked Mole Rats

Naked mole-rats are marvelous and bizarre rodents, arguably the weirdest mammals God made. These East African critters do not get tumors. They are immune to certain types of chronic pain and even the irritant found in chili peppers. These odd little subterraneans live their lives like social insects in 300-strong colonies. In the tunnel recesses, a […]

Posted on
June 1, 2018
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Seed Germination

Spring has finally arrived at my home in the State of NH. Bulbs that we planted in fall have now sprouted. The process of germination is fascinating. In New England, seeds of native berries, like raspberries and blackberries, need to be abraded in a bird’s gizzard (eroded by digestive acids) before water and air can enter […]

Posted on
May 1, 2018
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Protein Machines – Part 7

This last installment in our series on nanomachinery in the cell will focus on a microscopic power generator: ATP synthase. This machine resembles an energy-producing water wheel or windmill. But instead of making electricity, it produces ATP molecules (over 100 per second), the primary energy source for the cell. You may recall our discussion of […]

Posted on
April 2, 2018
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Protein Machines – Part 6

This month we turn our attention to a tiny little molecular machine that has become an icon of intelligent design, the bacteria flagellum. The single-celled E coli bacterium is so small that 10,000 can fit on the head of a pin. These rod-shaped cells move around through liquid by using an outboard engine called a […]

Posted on
March 1, 2018
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Protein Machines – Part 5

In recent months we have been considering the sophisticated microscopic machinery of the cell. This time I would like to simplistically discuss a couple of the amazing genetic replication proteins. Our DNA is wound up like a twisted rope. Unwinding it is the job of a protein machine called helicase. Like the motor protein kinesin, […]

Posted on
February 1, 2018
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Protein Machines – Part 4

Last month I likened the tiny organelles in living cells to specialized buildings in a walled town. But how does the cell transport the goods from one facility to another? One such microscopic delivery agent is the motor protein kinesin (see animation to the right). Running on fuel known as ATP, this “FedEx agent” of […]

Posted on
January 1, 2018
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Protein Machines – Part 3

In Darwin’s day, little was understood about the human cell. It is somewhat understandable that those scientists thought cells could form spontaneously from non-life. They could see the nucleus and the outer wall (cell membrane) but couldn’t see the complexity that lay deep inside. Starting around 1900 the cell’s tiny organelles were described (immediate right). In more recent […]

Posted on
December 2, 2017
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Protein Machines – Part 2

Last month we began a series on the marvelous protein machines in the cell. I mentioned that proteins are a bit like the building blocks that make up the infrastructure of a large complex. But let’s be a bit more specific than that. Proteins are built up of chains of amino acid molecules (like the […]

Posted on
November 1, 2017
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Protein Machines – Part 1

This month I want to kick off a new blog series, focusing on protein machines, the tiny molecular wonders that conduct the activities at a cellular level. First a bit of background. Cells are largely made of water and proteins. Think of the proteins as being  like the bricks that make up a building or the […]

Posted on
October 2, 2017
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The Mathematical Universe

Albert Einstein once commented, “The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible!” The universe around us is logical and follows laws that can be precisely modeled by mathematics. Why is this? In 2015 Robert Nelson, a professor at the University of Maryland, authored an intriguing book: God? Very Probably: Five Rational […]

Posted on
September 1, 2017
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